How to protect yourself from the great Virginia Flu outbreak

The CDC STILL wants you to get your flu shot


The Center for Disease Control is urging people get their flu shots. Director Dr. Thomas Frieden is reminding people that the flu is serious and unpredictable.

Frieden says getting a flu shot doesn't only protect you from the virus, but also those around you. Last year, about 45-percent of adults got vaccinated, which was a one-point-five-percent drop from 2014.

Getting vaccinated is most important for people over 65-years-old because they are more likely to be affected by the virus.

Source: Forbes

*LIST* Ways To Stay Healthy At Work During Flu Season

‘Tis the season for coughing, sneezing, and stomach bugs that seem to pass through workplaces faster than preschools. The thing is, office spaces are ideal incubators for germs and there’s rarely any fresh air in there. You might think that the biggest issue in the office for spreading germs is people sneezing and not covering their mouths, but the reason viruses move so fast is from people touching and infecting commonly shared items.

Microbiology professor Charles Gerba led a study to see how germs get passed around at work and found that four hours after they put harmless viruses on some worker’s hands, they had spread to half the other worker’s hands and half the commonly touched surfaces.

And here’s a disgusting tidbit for you: the cleanest thing in an office is the top of the toilet seat. Yep, that thing gets sanitized so often, there are 400 times more bacteria on a desk top, according to Gerba.

But how long do these germs hang out there, waiting to get you sick? Most cold and flu viruses can last two to three days on a surface, but stomach bugs can linger for up to 30 days! So you can’t avoid all the viruses, but you can reduce your risk by:

  • Washing your hands often - with soap and warm water. The use a paper towel to turn off the faucet and open the door.
  • Use alcohol-based hand sanitizers.
  • Don’t touch your nose, eyes, or mouth - it just spreads the germs.
  • Use disinfecting wipes on the things everyone in the office touches - Gerba says they “reduce the concentration of viruses by 99%.” Wipe your desk and phones every day, and hit the other germiest places in the office too - computer keyboards and mouse, copy and fax machines, elevator buttons, breakroom coffee pot handle, microwave buttons and sink area.
  • Avoid handshaking and hugs - it’s awkward, but tell them it’s because of flu season.
  • Take care of yourself - eat foods with lots of vitamin C and drink lots of water.
  • Open a window if you can - Fresh air won’t get rid of germs, but it will help with mold and other toxins that can cause allergic reactions.
  • Stay home if you are sick - Everyone wants to feel like they’re indispensable, but no one wants you to come in and spread your germs around infecting everyone else.

Source: Huffington Post

 

Cold And Flu Food "Cures" That Can Actually Make You Feel Worse

People mean well, they really do. So when you get sick, they’re always sharing the list of miracle food cures that you need to eat or drink ASAP to get your cold or flu under control. And some remedies – like chicken soup and hot tea with honey – actually have scientific evidence to back up claims that they help with symptoms. Still, these so called “cures” won’t help your sniffling, sneezing or coughing end sooner and they could even make you feel worse. That’s the last thing you need, so avoid the following:

  • Orange juice or citrus fruits - When someone hears you might be coming down with something, they’re quick to hand you a big glass of OJ. But you don’t really need to chug that big glass of sugary liquid, because a review of about 30 studies found that the vitamin C in OJ, oranges or lemons can’t get rid of the cold faster or ease symptoms. Research showed you’d have to down 8,000 mg of vitamin C – the equivalent of 64 glasses of juice – at the first sign of symptoms for it to help make you feel better. It doesn’t even help to take it in supplement form because taking a pill with more than 2,000 mg vitamin C could cause vomiting, abdominal pain and even kidney stones. And get this: Doctors say our bodies can only absorb about 500 mg at a time anyway, no matter if it’s from food or a pill.
  • Zinc Rich Anything - Before you run to the store in your weakened condition to get foods with lots of zinc, like beef and pumpkin seeds, save your energy. Registered dietitian Rachel Begun says it’s not proven that zinc can make you better sooner and some people even get nauseous from zinc lozenges.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar - People say ACV can do all kinds of stuff, like melt fat, clear up acne and even end arthritis, but it’s just not true. And it can’t cure a cold either. Yes, it has antimicrobial properties, but colds and the flu are caused by viruses, not bacteria, so it won’t help.
  • Coconut Oil - This also has antimicrobial properties, but they still won’t help with colds and the flu.
  • Hot Toddies - The whiskey might make you feel better but it’s not going to help with your sniffles. Alcohol is a toxin, so your body is working hard to get rid of it and it’s better to let all that energy go toward fighting off the infection instead. Plus, booze dehydrates you, and that makes any illness worse. So skip the toddies and drink more water instead.

Source: Eat Clean

Folks Increasing Hand Washing to Avoid Flu

  • The 2016 Healthy Hand Washing Survey has found that more and more people are taking extra care to wash their hands during flu season in order to stay healthy.
  • 71% of adults say they always wash their hands immediately after coming into contact with a sick child, while a majority of folks also wash their hands after sneezing, coughing or visiting a doctor's office.
  • 40% of people say they don’t increase their hand washing during flu season

Working in an office these days is a hotbed of germs, with people coughing and sneezing all around you. And try as you might, simply staying away from those sickie colleagues may not be enough to keep you from coming down with the flu. The good news? There are things you can do to protect yourself from those germs, and it seems more and more people are taking these extra steps.

The 2016 Healthy Hand Washing Survey has found that more and more people are taking extra care to wash their hands during flu season in order to stay healthy.

We all know kids are the worst germ carriers out there, which is likely why 71% of adults say they always wash their hands immediately after coming into contact with a sick child. A majority of folks also wash their hands after sneezing, coughing or visiting a doctor's office and since germs can travel 12-feet through the air, that’s only going to help you.

  • Meanwhile at home, hand washing rules are very strict for some parents. In fact, 87% demand the kids wash up after using the bathroom, while 71% must wash up before eating and 55% must wash up after sneezing or blowing their nose.
  • But it seems not everyone is stepping up the cleanliness game in order to avoid the flu. The survey found that 40% of people say they don’t increase their hand washing during flu season, so basically, good luck not catching something.

Source: BradleyCrop.com


Scott Stevens

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